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Archive for the ‘Seven Satrapies’ Category

Real Life Fantasy: A Brief History of Blue

The color blue has a pretty awesome place in human history. Many professional smartypantses [archaeologists, evolutionary biologists, historians, et al] believe humans evolved the ability to perceive the color, in a gradual shift from bichromatic to trichromatic vision. Last time we shared a bit of Real Life Fantasy, it was mentioned that there’s no word for the color blue in ancient languages (including Hebrew, Latin, and Greek, among others). The coolest evidence of this lack is in Homer’s version of The Odyssey, in which he describes the sea as “wine-red” rather than any shade of blue. And if our man Homer didn’t even have a word for blue, it seems safe to expect that none of his friends had the word either.

But luckily for Ironfist, and Cruxer, and Samila Sayeh, blue started showing up in Egyptian jewelry around 4,000 BCE, and in pigment (known now as “Egyptian Blue”) around 2,200 BCE.

Egyptian Juglet, ca. 1750–1640 B.C. (Photo: Met Museum, Rogers Fund and Edward S. Harkness Gift, 1922. (CC0 1.0))

Multiple shades of blue–including ultramarine and cobalt blue– were being used by artists centuries before the era of the Seven Satrapies. By the time Gollaïr and Solarch show up around 142 anno lucidonius, they have a full complement of blues from which to choose.

Small sculpture of a young blue dragon
“Blue Morpho,” Windstone Editions

ANY way,  this entry into RLF canon is an article from My Modern Met–the website for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. There they talk about blue’s place in art history (which is to say, human history). It’s brief, and beautiful.

classic Vermeer portrait of a young woman wearing a blue headscarf
Vermeer’s Girl With a Pearl Earring

 

Fan Art Tuesday: A Turtle-Bear tattoo

Today we have a special edition of Fan Art Tuesday: Ben Crawford designed this Lightbringer tattoo, inspired by Kip’s turtle-bear.

Ben told us that he’s had to deal with a lot in the last couple of years, and seeing the turtle-bear helps him push through. Thanks for sharing the design with us, friend.

 

 

 

Fan Art Tuesday: Koriel Kruer

Hi friends! It’s been a minute since we’ve seen some sweet, sweet fan art. So I have a good one for you today!

A full-color map of The Seven Satrapies, as depicted by Koriel Kruer:

She sent this to us a while back, and I’m finally getting around to sharing it (sorry for the delay, Koriel).

You can find Ms. Kruer on Twitter, and find her AMAZING costume creations on Instagram. Seriously, check out her top nine from 2018:

Alrightey, back to the assisting grind. UGH, life is sooooo haaaaaard 😉

International Cover Art: China

Take a look at these stunning cover images for THE BROKEN EYE and THE BLOOD MIRROR!

 

 

That’s… Well, that’s all we have to say for now.

Look, y’all, Christmas is one week from today. Brent is holed up in his office with a cache of eggnog and gingerbread and refuses to leave until he’s done writing. All I’m saying is there had better be a BIG FREAKIN’ PRESENT for me under the tree this year.

“Goodreads Top 50 Fantasy Books”

Wow, check this out: I made the list of the Goodreads Top 50 Fantasy Books… twice! And it’s thanks to you!

Of course I had to dive in to the methodology, because at times my eyebrows did funny things at who wasn’t on the list. Here’s the official word: “These titles were chosen based on reader reviews, so every single book had to meet at least a 4.0 average rating from the Goodreads community. Then, for good measure, we looked at how many ratings each book has received. We also decided to select the first book in a series…”

(It’s always helpful to remember that Goodreads only went live in January of 2007, so books written before then are often scored lower–kids assigned to read a book may score it lower than their teachers would! Also, books that appeal to less tech savvy crowds who are less likely to use Goodreads will certainly have fewer reviews, and thus a lower placement on a list like this.)

BUT, caveats aside, I think this is a great place to find other great (and GREAT!) fantasy to read–and a nice place to complain that your favorites got overlooked! 😉

Go HERE to see the whole list, and to let your feelings be heard.